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How San Leandro School Ratings Influence Home Prices

The real estate search engine Zillow rates local schools.

 

Conventional wisdom says good public schools boost home values. The reverse is also true. The Zillow real estate search engine rated some local schools.

See how San Leandro schools stack up according to Zillow.

Now check out the median price of $309,000 (check out the graph for the price trend but be prepared for a stomach-dropping plunge.)

Now take a gander at Castro Valley's better-ranked schools, according to Zillow's calculations. 

And, no surprise, Castro Valley enjoys a median home price of $456,400 (see the trend here).

Comments? Thoughts? Observations?

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ikessler November 11, 2012 at 08:43 PM
Let’s look even more local. Home prices just within SL vary based on if you are in the “Roosevelt School District”. I question the fact that Sheffield Village residents can automatically send their children to Roosevelt - increasing their Oakland median home price. Although I am a resident in SL, pay taxes, have a business in SL, my median home price is considerably lower because I am not in the “Roosevelt School District”. When I questioned the Superintendent, there was no understanding of why Sheffield Village residents get this perk, that is until I got this (research done by city librarians) – please read below & then consider that maybe for SL residents with kids, this isn’t in OUR best interest anymore: "The Sheffield Village School was withdrawn from the Oakland Unified School District as a result of neighborhood petition drive to keep the school open and an interdistrict agreement between the Oakland and San Leandro school districts. In April 1963, more than 80% of Sheffield Village voters signed a petition to secede from the Oakland school district...the committee behind the petition drive was comprised of Sheffield Village School PTA and Dad's Club members. Oakland superintendent of schools Stuart S. Phillips was quoted as saying the Sheffield secession "will change the racial composition of other East Oakland schools." (Oakland Tribune, June 12, 1963) The Sheffield School's shift to the San Leandro School District became effective July 1964."
Paul November 11, 2012 at 08:51 PM
So if you are poor you can't learn? What a crock. I grew up in East Oakland, my family was poor, went to public school and raised by a single father that worked two jobs. I still received a good education and have a good job because education was valued in my family. My siblings did well also. When is personal responsibility going to be instilled instead of excuses?
David November 11, 2012 at 09:05 PM
Never. Politicians can't abide personal responsibility, it reduces their power and ability to extort more taxes from you.
David November 11, 2012 at 09:12 PM
Just one example. Maxwell Park in Oakland used to have one of the worst-performing grade schools in OUSD (now it's merely one of the worst). Over the past year, average $/sq foot of houses sold: $222. (redfin) Sheffield Village, also in Oakland, but with access to Roosevelt and SL schools... Average price of houses sold over the past year: $233. Wow. Access to Roosevelt sure does drive up property values (sarcasm). Also Sheffield Village has way less crime than Maxwell Park.
David November 11, 2012 at 09:21 PM
Now let's go across 580 to San Leandro, Roosevelt School District, North of Dowling: Price/sq ft last 12 months: $250. "Estudillo Estates": $269 You can make the better argument that just leaving Oakland and its higher parcel&property taxes leads to lower Sheffield Village prices, and higher property values on the SL side of the border, as all three neighborhoods have access to the same schools and crime in Sheffield Village is approximately the same as North SL. But actually thinking about what influences property prices, forming a hypothesis and testing it with 5 seconds of google and redfin is way too hard. It must just be the schools.
ikessler November 11, 2012 at 09:28 PM
I think we just look at different maps - so if yours covers 1 yr, here is a current 3 mo look. This one clearly shows Sheffield with a higher average than Farrelly Pond (which is Washington School District). It's $/sq ft is even higher than Estudillo Estates...I'm just saying, beyond the home vallue, with classroom sizes too large and resources maxed, maybe something from 1963 should be reviewed so that SL residents can get educated properly. http://www.trulia.com/home_prices/California/San_Leandro-heat_map/
David November 11, 2012 at 09:36 PM
I'm going on actual houses sold. There weren't very many houses in Sheffield sold in the past 3 months, 1 year is a better timeframe, especially since you know it's spurious if Sheffield is coming in higher than Estudillo. I understand what you're saying about trying to cut SV off from SL. I'm going back the original premise of this "article" or post--we have a great experiment to test the hypothesis. We have 2 Oakland neighborhoods, one with a terrible school, one with access to a bit better school district. Both have similar access to mass transit and freeways. etc etc. There's next to no difference in price. This article would "predict" a premium for Sheffield Village. Except that premium doesn't exist.
Craig Williams November 11, 2012 at 10:22 PM
Affluent areas also have parent organizations that supliment school budgets. We have an education foundation but more affluent communities have bigger ones with more resources. Also English Learning student ratios are probably higher the closer you live to bigger cities, in most cases.
Craig Williams November 12, 2012 at 02:34 AM
In other states property taxes go directly to support schools so there is a more direct correlation between local property values and educational resources. Much more money would be available for cities and schools in our state with a rational property tax system .The local control of setting property taxes was changed under Prop.13 .
Carol Parker November 12, 2012 at 10:09 AM
One thing that happens, David, is that in Oakland many parents who can afford private often go that route, leaving open slots in the public schools for children from out of the attendance area who may bring with them social problems and economic disadvantages from their own neighborhoods - outside of the affluent ones. When a school (particularly middle school and high school) becomes depopulated with its own neighborhood children and populated instead with children from out of the affluent neighborhood I think this is where you get those skewed results to which you refer. This is my own hypothesis about why the figures break the way you describe them. Do you agree this could be the reason behind it?
David November 12, 2012 at 02:25 PM
Carol, you just added to the reasons as to why school scores are not well correlated to local housing cost. Clearly you can have an affluent neighborhood with high house prices with mediocre or worse schools. Berkeley is another prime example.
David November 12, 2012 at 02:28 PM
There you go again. State spending on schools is up 80% on a per pupil, inflation-adjusted basis since Prop 13 was passed. In other states, perhaps more (although by no means all) property taxes are "kept" within the local districts. Other states have higher property taxes. All other states have lower income taxes and sales taxes. You know Craig, I'm with you, let's scrap Prop 13....if you're with me on scrapping either sales or income tax entirely. Your choice.
Craig Williams November 12, 2012 at 05:20 PM
California is not over taxing business .As a percent of economic activity its ranked 39th ,nationally . Per dollar of capital income, its 42nd. As a share of state and local taxes its 32nd ,see www.caltaxreform.org
Craig Williams November 12, 2012 at 05:22 PM
The sales tax is so high because there are so many commercial property tax loopholes.
David November 12, 2012 at 09:59 PM
The taxes in general are too high because California spends too much. 25% more per person, inflation adjusted than we did 30 years ago. For what? Worse roads, worse schools. But our "civil servants" get top benefits for top incompetence. But hey, Craig, let's meet in the middle. You get to hike commercial properties' taxes, we abolish the sales or income tax, take your pick. I'm even giving you a choice.
Craig Williams November 12, 2012 at 11:31 PM
Conservatives in the state may not be in a position to decide tax policy with less than a third of the legislature and no statewide office holders. With a split role or what is sometimes called classification, Massachusetts has the best schools in the country, they pay a 6.25 percent sales tax without a sales tax on clothes. We don't have split role are ranked 41st in education and pay a 10 percent sales tax , including clothes.
David November 13, 2012 at 12:58 AM
Yes yes, spending more makes all the difference. Which is why OUSD is better than SLUSD, because it spends 25%++ more per pupil than SLUSD. Why if only we spent even more per Californian, schools and roads and everything else would improve just like it has over the past 30 years, when California was steadily increasing spending on schools and roads and everything at a clip higher than inflation and population growth. What's the definition of insanity again? Oh yeah, doing the same thing over and over again, expecting a different result. Or Craig.
Craig Williams November 13, 2012 at 01:00 AM
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David November 13, 2012 at 01:03 AM
But I'm glad you agree with me. You want a Massachusetts tax regime? Lower sales taxes and a FLAT income tax rate of 5.25%? Fine by me, except I'd state if you're keeping both taxes, it would have to be enshrined in another proposition that income & sales taxes could never rise above that. I'd prefer to cut one or the other. Sales or income taxes abolished. Which one Craig? Washington state does fine with no income tax, Oregon does fine with no sales tax, ditto for Texas, Nevada, etc. What are you scared of? But you're right. Liberals won't have anyone to blame as the continue to convert California into Detroit or upstate New York with better weather. Enjoy your added taxes. It won't improve the schools, but you'll feel better I'm sure, as you're impoverished by your favorite liberals in government.
Craig Williams November 13, 2012 at 01:14 AM
I'm all for controlling spending. I would cap government salaries at $100,000 if I were elected governor .Many teachers don't make half that. Also don't forget we help businesses by the heavy usage of immigrants which means lower wages for them to pay but more English learning students, so business gets a break and keeps wages down while schools need to spend more to take care of their children with language barriers. The roads are a free lunch for the oil and auto industries. So employers in these two industries should pay more in taxes since their products wear onpublic roads and profit from it more than any other industries.
David November 13, 2012 at 01:46 AM
The median starting salary, not counting benefits for a California school teacher is $57,000. Is there anything in your head resembling factual numbers regarding the private economy and public sector? You want to cut off immigration? Talk to your President and Governor about their amnesty programs. You'll get willing partners in the Republican party, Craig.
Jessica Gardner November 13, 2012 at 04:03 AM
The only way to improve the schools is to scrap the whole system, from the top down. The whole system is broken especially in San leandro, if you want to know what really goes on or for that matter doesn't come spend a day in a classroom. It's a huge joke.
Craig Williams November 13, 2012 at 05:11 AM
The point David is that employers want immigrants ,especially undocumented immigrants because they have fewer rights and they can pay them less. On the other hand their kids will need more help in school which increases the cost of education, especially in California.
Jessica Gardner November 13, 2012 at 06:45 AM
Most kids need help in schools not just immigrants, the kids that need the most help are the autistic and kids with learning disabilities. The special needs kids most need a teacher per student. Some of the immigrant kids are the ones in class learning a subject in two languages. Come and visit a class if you want to see what is going on.
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David November 13, 2012 at 02:48 PM
Sure Craig. Judging by everything you've written, you know nothing of what employers want or need.
David November 13, 2012 at 02:53 PM
Jessica, "special needs" kids consume 5% of the education budget. They're a convenient excuse for educrats who wish to continue to use them as hostage for perpetual tax hikes, but once again, the math doesn't support the argument.
Craig Williams November 13, 2012 at 03:29 PM
David your arguement is that labor costs have nothing to do with hiring trends or the cost of production. Profound ,we can end the wage drought with your permission. You argue that wages are less a factor than taxes, right?Smart thinking.
David November 13, 2012 at 04:01 PM
Craig, every large survey of employers and small business state their number one concern, that's been constant the past 4 years is... Sales. (or lack thereof) After that it's.... Taxes. (too high) After that it's... Regulations. (too many, cost of compliance too high) Nowhere in there is the cost, scarcity or difficulty in hiring. Again, you know nothing of what employers want. It's abundantly clear.
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